1 King’s 19:9

“And he came thither unto a cave, and lodged there; and, behold, the word of the LORD came to him, and he said unto him, What doest thou here, Elijah?’ ” (KJV)

 

Depression is a word that we don’t like to talk about; especially as Christians. However, the truth is that many people feel anxious or depressed at times. These feelings are normal when we lose a loved one, experience a divorce, get fired from a job, or we encounter a difficult situation.

To overcome depression, we must be able to identify some of the sign, like restlessness, mood swings, feelings of helplessness or the inability to perform simple tasks. Once we think we are depressed, it is vitally important that we get some help. We can talk to a mental health or medical professional, pastoral counselor or clergy, loved ones or friends. The level of care we seek depends on the seriousness of our depression. The emphasis is that we don’t allow fear or shame to keep us from getting the help that we so desperately need.

In today’s story, Elijah, one of the most influential Old Testament persons, suffered a classical case of depression. At one point, he was so depressed, he asked God to take his life (v.4). At other times, he missed work for 40 days, hid in a cave, and thought he was all alone. However, at the right moment, God spoke to him and asked him a thought provoking question, “Where are you Elijah?”

Like Elijah, we may not know where we are, and we may run and hide because the pain and the road ahead seems too hard. When this occurs, seek help from God in prayer and several others that I mentioned earlier. For who knows, if we are willing to fight, we may be able to overcome depression.

Dear Lord…help us to humbly acknowledge when we feel depressed, and to seek out the help we need. Amen!

Blessings,

IMG_0805
Pastor Wayne Penn, Sr.

Written by Wayne

Wayne is a husband, father, avid reader and writer, and youth minister who happens to believe that Jesus is central to every aspect of life…the individual, family, society, government, philosophy, the arts…and everything in between. He’s committed to challenging preconceived notions about what it means to follow Jesus, and seeks to engage the culture instead of running from it.